Delivered January 26, 1963, Downtown Ford, Los Angeles. First Owner, Anne Abiden, after receiving the Cobra immediately sent the car back to Shelby American to have the Street Roadster converted to full Competition by Shelby's race shop. Allen Abiden, the son, wanted to hire a driver and go racing.

Shelby American Race Shop upgrades are recorded as: A race specification engine upgrade; custom-fabricated headers and side exit exhaust; engine oil cooler; larger front brake calipers; forward-braced roll bar; F/R pindrive wheel hubs; replacement of critical stock suspension/ chassis hardware with aviation specification hardware; rear wheel arch flares; Halibrand "Kidney Bean" Magnesium Racing Wheels; 15" × 6 front and 15" x 7 rear, with Goodyear Blue Streak Racing tires.After the Cobra was converted to full competition; Cobra CSX-2049 was entered in 10 West Coast Racing Events from April 1963 through November 1963 with several hired drivers. Those listed drivers for Cobra CSX-2049 were Ted Roberts, Allen Grant and Paul Cunningham.

In November of 1963 SCCA Event at Willow Springs Raceway, Rosemond, CA, Cobra CSX-2049, in a single car shunt was launched in a series of end over end flips. Tragically, the driver, Paul Cunningham, lost his life as a result of the crash. From that day, over 6 decades ago, Cobra CSX-2049 has remained clouded in mystery and subject of several persons attempts to claim ownership of the missing Cobra.

Cobra CSX-2049 was purchased by Lanse Haselrig in March of 1967 from the original owner, Anne Abiden and son Albert Abiden of Riverside, CA. Lanse having taken possession of the complete Cobra CSX-2049 as returned from the Shelby American factory to the owner Albert Abidin after their damage inspection. Upon Lanse's receiving the CSX-2049, Lanse disassembled the car planning to repair the CSX-2049 and race the Cobra himself. Unfortunately, Lanse' dreams were put on hold when he was drafted and deployed to Vietnam. He put the disassembled Cobra CSX-2049 in storage at a friend's restoration shop while serving his country.

From that point forward the Cobra CSX-2049 where abouts and history became clouded when opportunists attempted to create several "Air Cars" with stolen piece of Cobra CSX-2049 for a profit. After years having passed, multiple lawsuits and much effort expended to right the wrongs and preserve the true history of the Cobra CSX-2049, the story now has an ending.

Cobra CSX-2049 has finally been carefully and meticulously restored as it was last raced in 1963 after remaining in storage by the second owner Lanse Haselria for nearly 60 years.

Historical racing moments